More American Cartoons On Canada

I enjoy the diversion of witty cartoons (especially those in The New Yorker magazine), and I’ve posted previously about funny cartoons that comment on American perceptions and stereotypes about Canada (for example, here and here).  Below are a few others that may provide for some amusement.

___

This one deals with the general lack of knowledge about Canada by many Americans:

What part of Canada . . .

___

Americans know they share many similarities with Canadians and might be happy to think that’s true in all respects but every now and then something will remind otherwise — such as the finishing of a sentence with an “eh?” or a different pronunciation of a common word (like “about” pronounced as “aboot”) — even if they can’t put their finger on it:

wYou-seem-familiar-.-.-.

___

Of course, there’s the widely held perception of Canadians as being polite to a fault:

Canadian Mob

___

This one, while showing two Canadian politicians, plays on the notion held by many Americans of U.S. “exceptionalism” and the idea that Canada doesn’t often register with many Americans:

scan0002

___

And . . . there’s the word “about” again:

Canadian CSI

(Image credits to the various cartoonists: Liam Walsh, D. Reilly, P.C. Vey, Paul Noth, Dan Piraro)

54 responses

  1. Many years ago I met an American who asked if we had VCR’s in Canada. My travelling companion was quick and said “yes we do and next week we are getting flush toilets.” He knew he had been had.

  2. Reblogged this on The Chicago Files and commented:
    Here is a wonderful post reblogged from “O Canada”. Brett has a wonderful blog. As an American, he writes and posts pictures about Canada. I am a Canadian who writes about the differences between Canada and America. Thank you, Brett.

  3. Hi Brett. I enjoyed this piece. This from a Canadian woman who bumped into a table and, in a moment of distraction, apologized to it. I sometimes wonder our politeness comes from the influx of Loyalists affected our prevailing culture. I’m thinking of Quakers and like minded folks who were adverse to conflict.

    • Gwen, I’ve often wondered about the cultural roots of that as well. I think it’s probably something that goes back to the early period as you suggest. Best, Brett

  4. I find Canadians to be a mixed bag. Some can be quite standoffish, which gets a shrug from me. Coming from the States, I’ve seen much worse. Others are very peculiar in the sense of personality. There are a lot of blank looks, and signs that they have no idea how to handle me. I don’t recall being rude or uncooperative, but there’s a sense of confusion about them. I’m not sure what to make of that. There are also genuinely nice Canadians that fit the stereotype perfectly. In other words, they’re just as human as anyone else.

    Then there are the Ontarians on the freeway down here. They can get real dicey.

  5. Pingback: How to Complain Like a Canadian | Kiwi Over/CCC

  6. That is really good Brett. I have to admit everyone here in Germany knows Canada. But the funny thing is when I tell them that i will live in Ontario I can see some question marks in their faces.

  7. Reblogged this on Yoh! WTF? and commented:
    I remember when I lived in Calgary, I’d speak with many Americans who genuinely believed that we had moose and polar bear roaming the streets of Calgary. Some even believed me when I jokingly said that instead my home in the city and a cottage in the countryside, I had a home in the city and an igloo in the countryside!

    Go figure!

  8. Hmmm, I guess some Americans forgot Alaska is further north than Calgary. However in Calgary it does really get as cold as -25 degrees C or -31 degrees C. Oh, I guess I shouldn’t speak metric at all.

    There are some highly ignorant Canadians about the U.S. also. Maybe they are glued in front of TV, watching a lot of U.S. in Canada. We do get a lot of U.S. tv stations beamed into Canada, not the other way around.

  9. Cute but they also display U.S. ignorance about your country. To be honest, I know many who are jealous of Canadians simply because of these stereotypes! Here’s to you, eh?

  10. i am canadian, and i have never heard ‘aboot’ and we all say ‘eh’ sometimes, but we are only making fun of americans who think we say ‘eh’…. so i’m not sure where all this stuff comes from, except bob and doug mckenzie, so, yeah, none of us would say ‘eh’ if it wasn’t for bob and doug… when i phone people, to this day i say ‘hello eh’ in a bob and doug accent, and we still laugh, but yeah, we are laughing at americans, haha, not ourselves :)

  11. Nice post. I learn something totally new and challenging on websites I stumbleupon on a daily basis.
    It’s always helpful to read through content from other authors and use a little something
    from their web sites.

  12. Just spent a week kayaking out of Fort McNeil on northern Vancouver Island. There were lots of “ehs”. :) Also, I am a fan of the New Yorker— mainly because of the cartoons. I should be blogging about the kayaking trip in a couple of weeks. But for now I am off to Burning Man, where I suspect there are lots of Canadians, eh. Loved your blog. –Curt

Your Comments Are Most Welcome

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,598 other followers

%d bloggers like this: