Artist to Appreciate: Miyoshi Kondo

M. Kondo, Take Off 2011

Miyoshi Kondo, Take Off (2011)

Many of Miyoshi Kondo’s brightly colored gouache paintings may appear at first to convey images of pure whimsy, but looking deeper there is very thoughtful and wry commentary at work in her art.   Among the themes that Kondo explores in her recent art are concepts of home and place, our relationship to the environment, and how technology influences us in ways both positive and less than desirable.  Overall, I discern a strong sense of optimism that comes through in her art, which I think is reflective of this highly personable artist herself.

Originally from Toronto and a graduate of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Kondo’s distinctive style is a wonderful example of the vibrant arts scene in and around the charming town of Wolfville, Nova Scotia, where she resides, and the province generally.  She is also among the many fine artists represented by the very progressive Argyle Fine Arts in Halifax.

More of Kondo’s terrific work can be seen at her official artist site here and at Argyle’s site here.

M. Kondo, Take Me Home 2016

Miyoshi Kondo, Take Me Home (2016)


Miyoshi Kondo, Life is A Highway (2017)


Miyoshi Kondo, Seaside (2013)


Miyoshi Kondo, Flight (2017)


Miyoshi Kondo, Excess Baggage Messenger (2017)


Miyoshi Kondo, Holdout (2015)


Miyoshi Kondo, Hung to Dry (2013)


Miyoshi Kondo, Over the Edge (2010)


Miyoshi Kondo, Red Rooves (2010)

(Image Credits: Miyoshi Kondo)

Whack A Canadian


A weekly treat is reading through each new issue of The New Yorker, one of my all-time favorite magazines because it is so consistently excellent.  Its cartoons are an indispensable hallmark of the magazine’s style and, over the years, its cartoonists occasionally have focused their good-natured humor at Canadians or Americans’ general (mis)perception of Canada.

In keeping with that tradition, the most recent issue of The New Yorker includes the above cartoon by P.C. Vey playing on the notion of Canadian politeness.  It’s funny but probably goes a bit too far — yes, Canadians are generally polite but certainly not pushovers.  Of course, it’s all in good fun and not to be taken too seriously.  As previous commenters about such cartoons have noted, if you have to have a reputation, that of being overly polite isn’t a bad one to have.

Image Credit: P.C. Vey, The New Yorker

Related posts on O’ Canada:

More American Cartoons on Canada

Another Amusing Take on Canadian Politeness

“You First. I Insist”:  A Canadian Standoff

Like Minnesota — Only Bigger?

Down here below the 49th parallel (north) we’re likely to learn a whole lot more about Canada this month as an incidental effect of the attention focused on the Vancouver Winter Olympics.  And to truly appreciate the country, you have to get a sense of the affable Canadian sense of humor.  In that spirit Bruce Headlam, a Canadian who is the Media Editor of The New York Times penned a humorous piece appearing in today’s Times entitled “Crib Notes on Canada, From a Canadian”, which pokes good-natured fun at his fellow countryman.  Among his observations that prompt a hearty chuckle, Headlam offers a list of notable dates in Canadian history, including this one:

“1867: Almost a century after America declares its independence from Great Britain through the bloody crucible of revolution, Canada declares its sovereignty after filling out the necessary paperwork.”

Enjoy the rest of the article here:

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