James Fowler’s Wonderful Geometric Cityscapes

James Fowler “The Village, Toronto” (2017)

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James Fowler’s non-traditional landscape paintings perfectly merge broad aerial-like vistas with a strong geometric and digital sensibility.  His artwork hints at the methods of the nineteenth century pointillists and, of more contemporary vintage, Chuck Close’s “pixellated” portrait paintings.    The result in Fowler’s talented hands and imagination is a distinctive abstract style of landscape that is slightly whimsical and very impressive.

As this Toronto-based artist notes on his websites’s artist statement, the idea, partly, is to convey the “lively feelings one gets when flying into a new big city for the first time, when we try to take everything in, or the lasting impressions stored in our memories of traveling anywhere far from home.”  Well said!  And he’s done this with cities throughout Canada, the United States and across the world, as indicated by the small sampling noted here.

More of Fowler’s vibrant work can be seen on his website here and on his Twitter feed here.

James Fowler, “8Bit Montreal” (2017)

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James Fowler, “San Francisco” (2016)

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James Fowler, “Quebec City” (2019)

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James Fowler, “Fredericton” (2018)

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James Fowler, “Downtown, Kansas City” (2019)

 

(Image Credits: James Fowler)

 

Similar Posts on O’Canada:

Artist to Appreciate: Katharine Burns

Elyse Dodge’s Imaginative Geometric Landscapes

Artist to Appreciate: Miyoshi Kondo

 

Manhole Covers Roundabout Saint John

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Another installment of these cast iron circles, this time from Saint John, New Brunswick.

Hard to say for certain, but I found this group a bit grittier than those in other places.

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Similar Posts on O’Canada:

> Halifax’s Manhole Covers

> Creativity Afoot!: Toronto’s Varied Manhole Covers

> Manhole Covers of Quebec City

 

Laurie Campbell Perfectly Captures Winter in the City

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Making one’s way through almost any busy city during snowy winter days requires a certain hunkered-down and focused steely resolve.  Montreal realist painter Laurie Campbell beautifully captures this feeling in her cityscapes of Montreal and elsewhere.  The chill in the air, the wetness of walkways covered with snow and slush, and the occasional icy slipperiness beneath the feet are all perfectly evoked on her canvases.

Given the present season, I’ve chosen to highlighted her winter scenes here.  However, Campbell’s artist site and the galleries that carry her work (including Montreal’s Galerie Eric Klinkhoff and Toronto’s Roberts Gallery) are worth visiting to appreciate her wide range of subject matter and the artistry and skill that she brings to her work.  On her website you’ll find several themed series of work, including ones featuring rainy day people, umbrellas, New York City, park hockey, among others.

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(Image Credits: Laurie Campbell)

Signs of Vibrant Charlottetown

Charlottetown is a delightful city on Prince Edward Island, whose residents are blessed to live in such a vibrant place and beautiful province.  Small cities and towns throughout Canada often struggle to sustain a thriving economy and a high quality of life.  To its credit, Charlottetown appears to have figured out a formula that works well.

On a recent visit to its city center, I was amazed at the evident diversity of its wonderful shops, eateries and arts and music scene.  These shop signs are a small reflection of that.  Although PEI may be the smallest province in terms of geography and population, it holds its own quite nicely.

Similar posts on O’Canada:

» Annapolis Royal Through Its Signs

» On the Street Toronto: Fun & Unusual Signs

» Colorful Montreal Shop Signs

Shades of Toronto Graffiti (Part 3- Designs)

On the walls of Toronto some of the street art exhibits strong elements of design, such as these examples. I especially like the piece just above, which is painted on a piece of plywood tacked onto the side of a building.

“Having a swell time . . .”: Vintage Hospital Postcards

zGeneral-Hospital-Montreal

Postmarked 1913.  A cozy looking place.

Hospitals seem a peculiar and dreary subject for postcards.  But back in the day — before routine outpatient procedures and hospitals speedily freeing up beds — time in hospital (as patient or visitor) regularly spanned several days or longer, so penning a brief note to update absent friends or loved ones was probably not so odd.  And what better way to do it than with one of the colored cards conveniently available at the hospital!

zGeneral-Hospital-Saint-Joh

 Postmarked 1945. The note starts out: “Having a swell time.”  Love those roadsters!

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zOntario-Hospital

About 1948.  Yikes — looks more like a prison!

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zRoyal-Victoria-Hospital

About 1910.  Regal digs.  Notice horse and buggy to bottom left.

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zToronto-General-Hospital

 Postmarked 1935.  Street car or bus passing by.

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