Vintage Tools From 1912 Hardware Catalogue

Wrenches2

Because I love doing projects that involve hand tools I probably have way more than any reasonable person should have.  But if you work enough with your hands you know that the right tool makes all the difference.  Traditional hardware stores are now a dying breed of retail but back in the day they were the one-stop shop for most tool needs. The McLennan, McFeely & Co. Hardware Store opened in Vancouver in 1885 and for many years was a substantial business enterprise.

These pages are from that merchant’s 1912 catalogue.  Among the wrenches above, the crescent adjustable wrench must have made quite a splash because it was only first introduced around 1907 and to this day is a standard in any well-equipped tool box. Though less common nowadays, variations of the hand drills pictured below can still be found today and are quite useful.

The City of Vancouver Archives has digitized some of the old McLennan, McFeely catalogues, and flipping through the pages makes for an interesting diversion as you ponder how much more laborious it was to do various chores over a century ago.

Hand Drills

Simple Beauty in Stanley Park

Blades of Grass, Stanley Park

Along the Seawall, Stanley Park, Vancouver, B.C.

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“I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars.”
                                                                                  ~ Walt Whitman

Old Maps and Their Hidden Stories

Nova Canadae 1693

Nova Canadae (1693)

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Good historical maps combine science and art to guide its users through its subject geography, with the best such maps igniting the imagination about the many backstories underpinning its cartographical offerings. Some of the oldest maps of North America include parts of Canada, which then featured place names such Terra Nova (now Newfoundland), Nouvelle France (most of what is now Eastern Canada), and Acadie (now Nova Scotia).  The following collection showcases some interesting old maps of Canada I’ve come across.

Related Posts on O’Canada:

1933 Quebec Tourist Road Map

Stanley Park — Non-Traditional Views

Blades of Grass, Stanley Park

Blades of Grass, Stanley Park

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Many photos from Vancouver’s Stanley Park are of the more traditional sights there, such as the native American totem poles about which I posted earlier.  I certainly have taken my share of those but I also like less customary images of off-the-beaten-track details from a location such as Stanley Park.   These images I captured from the Park are examples of ordinary details that convey a different sort of majesty for that place.

Weathered Mooring, Stanley Park

Weathered Mooring, Stanley Park

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Bush and Rock Minimalism, Stanley Park

Bush and Rock Minimalism, Stanley Park

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Along the Seawall, Stanley Park

Along the Seawall, Stanley Park

Stanley Park Totem Poles

Chief Skedans Mortuary Pole, Stanley Park, Vancouver

Chief Skedans Mortuary Pole, Stanley Park, Vancouver

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Stanley Park is a beautiful, peaceful greenspace on a sprawling peninsula in the heart of bustling Vancouver.  The Park’s collection of native American totem poles is eye-catching and conjures marvelment and reverence at the creativity of the people of the Pacific Northwest that made these exquisite carvings.

In these photos from a trip there not long ago it was challenging to separate the poles from the surrounding trees so these don’t do justice to the majesty of these enduring artifacts.

Sky Chief Pole, Stanley Park, Vancouver

Sky Chief Pole, Stanley Park, Vancouver

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Here Comes the Winter Olympics

For the second time, Canada is set to host the Winter Olympics (the first being in Calgary in 1988).  Here in Atlanta, where I now live, we hosted the Summer Olympics in 1996 and I recall the city was abuzz about the preparations and anticipation of having the event come together and being the focal point for so much of the world’s sports attention.  I’ve no doubt that Vancouver — what an amazing place! — will acquit itself well and that the planners and the city itself will all breathe a collective sigh of exhilaration and relief and deserve a well-earned pat on the back as the games draw to a close in about two weeks time.  Good luck to the athletes — and godspeed Vancouver!

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